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These 6 Painful Medieval Medical Procedures Will Make You Cringe

Going to the physician for a regular examination is a dull job. After all, you more often than not feel good. You don”t want a physician to let you know what you already understand.

Unless, obviously, something is wrong with you. In this situation, I”m grateful I don”t live in medieval times. After seeing what these so called “doctors” did to their patients during visits, I”m not sure I”d make it out alive!

1.) Cataract Removal

1.) Cataract Removal

Medieval doctors would regularly use needle or a knife to remove a cataract through the cornea. They’d then drive the eye lens out of the capsule and to the underparts of the the eye.

Eventually, this system was replaced by the inflow of Islamic medicine with suction systems.

2.) Dwale

2.) Dwale

Marked dwah-lay, this practice contained various potions, elixirs, and concoctions partly inspired by pagan medical treatments.

A few of these potions were not so weak they could really kill you.

The treatments contained castrated boar gall, lettuce juice, and hemlock juice. All were combined with wine. But that”s the last great flavor individuals would have. They’d frequently die as an outcome of the ingredients.

3.) Trepanning

3.) Trepanning

Trepanning involves a “doctor” cutting a hole into the skull. It was done to an individual suffering from seizures, mental illness, or skull breaks.

The survival rate was not astonishingly quite low, with little opportunity for illness.

4.) Metallic Catheters

4.) Metallic Catheters

Individuals in medieval times had disorders like today, but without access to antibiotics. Many individuals suffered from a bladder that was blocked. To repair this, a long metal tube

5.) Clysters

5.) Clysters

A metallic tube that was long called the clyster was added through the anus directly into the body that it could be passed through by various liquids. This was a way of administering an enema.

Its use was prevalent by King Louis XIV, although it seems very horrible.

It”s supposed the King had over 2,000 managements during his reign.

6.) Bloodletting

6.) Bloodletting

Bloodletting was not unusual for most of human history. It was modeled after the menstruation cycle as it “purged girls of poor humors.”

Barbers were the most likely to administer the bloodletting.

They’d make a little wound on the inner arm and discharge an amount of blood proper to the individual”s age, gender, and weight.

(via All That’s Interesting)

I don”t even care anymore that my physician ordered a test to screen for who knows what. In case it keeps me away from that brain exercise, I”m all for it!

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